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Alabama head coach Nick Saban reacts on the sidelines in the first half of an NCAA college football game against LSU, Saturday, Nov. 9, 2019, in Tuscaloosa , Ala. (AP Photo/Vasha Hunt)

How Nick Saban is adapting to COVID-19 changes

The year is 2020 and Nick Saban just now started using an e-mail address. Times are changing.

We’re currently living in unprecedented times where the world is dependent on technology to get us through the day. Saban, the same coach who previously stated he doesn’t even send texts, has shifted over to e-mail.

The Alabama head coach is using his time in quarantine to catch up with technology. In an interview with ESPN’s Maria Taylor, Saban said one positive is setting up his own e-mail account.

Saban said before people would forward e-mails to his wife, Terry, before she “fired” him and made him operate his own account.

“She said, ‘I’m not dealing with your stuff anymore.’ So I had to do it on my own…I’ve really come a long way.”

We’ve seen schools and programs adapt finding new ways of working around the COVID-19 pandemic. Since the SEC has given the OK allowing team meetings between players and coaches, Saban has became more tech-savvy by the day. Conducting weekly Zoom meetings or sending workouts through apps is now the routine for Alabama football. Saban said their first move while transitioning to online was making sure everyone was well-equipped with the technology necessary to move forward.

Technology is also making it easier for coaches to monitor players daily schedules. With the use of Apple Watches, strength and conditioning coaches can measure heart rate during a workout or sleep patterns at night.

Looking Ahead:

Saban discussed his proposed message of using an NFL model of 14 OTA days. He envisioned opportunities to work with his players on football-related type activity with so many days in the summer. Non-contact, non-pads, non-helmets.

Alabama finished the 2019 season 11-2 overall, second in the SEC West. The team was just shy of making the College Football Playoff for the first time since the tournament was created during the 2014 season.

Looking ahead, Saban is optimistic but taking it day-by-day. He expresses the response from his players has been positive but hopeful to see the field in the fall.

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